FAQs
FAQs

This page is designed to address some of the most frequently asked questions regarding immigration issues. The information provided here does not constitute legal advice and should not be interpreted as such. For specific questions, please contact us.

General Questions:

May a client hire law office from another state or out of the Country?
What is a visa?
Do countries charge for visas?
What is the process at an embassy or consulate?
What is the process for obtaining an immigrant visa?
Does a visa allow me to enter the U.S.?
How do you qualify for a Green Card?
What is the difference between an immigrant and a nonimmigrant visa?
How can I become a legal permanent resident or green card holder?
What is the definition of an immediate family?
What is a "Green Card Lottery"?
What is a Political Asylum?

May a client hire law office from another state or out of the Country?

Yes. We serve clients anywhere in the United States and around the world.

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What is a visa?

A visa is permission granted and issued by another country for you to enter that country. Permission to enter another country is the sole prerogative of that country. There are several categories of visas. The requirements and processing times for your visa will depend on what you intend to do while you are abroad: visit, study or work.

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What is the process at an embassy or consulate?

Among other duties, the U.S. State Department is the U.S. federal government agency charged with the processing immigrant and non-immigrant visas. Our office represents foreign nationals before the U.S. State Department. The State Department's U.S. Embassies and Consulates are the oftentimes the first place foreign national nationals visits when they are applying for permission to enter the U.S (visa). Consular officers are the U.S. State Department's employees in charge of conducting the first risk/benefit analysis and issuing a decision on each foreign national's application for admission into the U.S. In general, there are two types of visas: immigrant and non-immigrant. The United States is still one of the most desired countries in the world as an immigration destination. Our firm assists companies and individuals with all details of US immigration law. We offer consultations, legal advice and attorney representation.
Let us assist you on the right path to successfully getting your USA visa.

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Do countries charge for visas?

Yes, all countries have visa fees. These vary from country to country and are levied in accordance with your purpose of entry. Visas for tourism are the least expensive, while those for permanent residency or working are more expensive.

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What is the process for obtaining an immigrant visa?

An immigrant (also called a "lawful permanent resident") is a foreign national who has been granted the privilege of living and working permanently in the United States. If you want to become an immigrant you must go through a multi-step process. Contact us for more information.

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Does a visa allow me to enter the U.S.?

A visa does not guarantee entry into the U.S. A visa allows a foreign citizen to travel to the U.S. port-of-entry, and the Department of Homeland Security U.S. immigration inspector authorizes or denies admission to the U.S.

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How do you qualify for a Green Card?

Initially, these cards were green, then red, white and blue. Nowadays, they are pink, but, unlike the color, the term “Green Card” has remained. Its main purpose is to identify the holder as a permanent resident of the United States of America. Obtaining a Green Card is not easy. First, you must find someone who wants to sponsor you (a close relative or a well-established company) so that you can come to the United States. You must also be able to prove that you are eligible in one of the available categories to obtain a permanent residence by meeting specific criteria. If you are not in the United States already, you must then apply for a visa through the American Embassy in your country of origin. The law provides many categories for permanent residency. Your profile must match one of these categories in order to be eligible for a Green Card.

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What is the difference between an immigrant and a nonimmigrant visa?

An immigrant visa grants the privilege of living and working permanently in the United States. A nonimmigrant visa is issued to persons with permanent residence outside the U.S. but who wish to be in the U.S. on a temporary basis, for example, tourism, medical treatment, business, temporary work, or study.

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How can I become a legal permanent resident or green card holder?

To become a legal permanent resident (or green card holder), you must first be admitted as an immigrant. The most common methods for obtaining an immigrant visa are:
1) through family relationship with a U.S. citizen or legal permanent resident, or
2) through employment. For more information, contact us.

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What is the definition of an immediate family?

Immediate Family definition:
  • Spouse of an American citizen, including widows.
  • Single individuals under the age of 21 with at least one parent who is an American citizen.
  • Both American parents if the individual is 21 or older.
  • Step kids and stepparent of American citizens under the age of 10.
  • American Parents and adopted kids, if the adoption occurred before the kid(s) became 16 years old.

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    What is a "Green Card Lottery"?

    A specific number of Green Cards are available to individuals in countries who in recent years have only a few immigrants to the United States. The purpose of this program is to ensure a diverse ethnic mixture among those who come to the United States. These Green Cards are randomly assigned via a computer.

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    What is a Political Asylum?

    The United States offers protection to individuals who have fear or have experienced persecution in their country of origin. The persecution must be based on race, religion, political opinion or affiliations. If you have recently arrived to the United States and believe that you may qualify for political asylum, please consult a qualified immigration attorney as soon as possible.

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